We installed the artwork  by Emmy Horstkamp and TMNK “Nobody” at Odeonsplatz this week.

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Crush Installation January 2015
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Artwork by Emmy Horstkamp and TMNK ” Nobody”
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TMNK “Nobody” in front of Crush Installation

There are a total of four art pieces on paper and a video art piece included with this installation.  Ideally, the back two pieces will be seen slightly through the front artwork. This worked perfectly when I tried it at the studio but, the lights in the display window are scorching bright so the LEDs don’t have a chance.

I debated turning off the overhead lights but the window is in the subway and the brightness of the window does draw your attention to it and the pieces tucked inside.

I discussed with TMNK moving the back pieces but I’m leaving the two back pieces where they are behind the two individual figures because the images change the Crush story if they are shown next to the individual figures instead of behind them.  Below are the two TMNK pieces which are not really visible but are on the walls at the subway:

All artists want their art in front of the public but street artists only get this opportunity for a short period of time before the art piece is covered over by another art  piece or painted over white/gray/beige.  Sometimes when you walk by a graffiti wall you see a fragment of what was there before but the viewer has no way of flipping the front piece up to look what is behind.

In the Crush installation, the front pieces could be flipped up if presented in a gallery space.  The viewer knows there is another piece and will be tempted to look at it. I know from a prior experience with multiple layers of canvas that viewers will flip to see what is behind even when the art piece is presented in a gallery space and there is no signage saying flip or keep your hands off.

TMNK Adding to Emmy’s Artwork

TMNK  is known for marking over other artist’s street art with his X, Crown and Love.  I found the following manipulation of another artist’s street piece in my photos from November 2015.

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Although artists are creating street art which is “temporary,” there is a feeling of ownership even though the piece is not legal. The owner of this piece would be the city of NYC.  Neither TMNK  nor the Pandabear artist would be able to say, “it’s mine” because the canvas they chose to use was not owned by them… such a lovely legal argument regarding intellectual property and property rights. In my conversations with TMNK, he admitted that artists got upset that he changed their work but that possessive energy belong only in the gallery on personally owned art materials, not on the streets.

Experimenting with this idea, I asked TMNK to work on top of my photographs in a continued effort to bring a sense of reverence to my digital photography.

Here is an example of the two pieces he created last week:

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The artwork has the feel of graffiti from the streets but is totally legal because I allowed TMNK to manipulate my photographs. This is unlike the other American artist who forget to communicate with the photographer before  using his artwork. TMNK cares about how other artists feels in the studio and he asked before drawing on the photos. I wasn’t sure how I would feel when he was done but at the moment I offered, I was curious and happy to experiment BECAUSE IT WAS A PRINT OF MY DIGITAL artwork and I could print another.

When he finished drawing, I liked what he did and decided to take the idea one step further. I asked TMNK to work over two of my digital prints on canvas from my Project T series.

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TMNK “nobody” Working over my T Series art pieces

How did I feel when he worked over the pieces which were digital with a bit of my own original artwork?  I felt happy.  No issues whatsoever.

BUT, I realised that I didn’t want TMNK touching my Plan B Dorothy art piece in the installation window. In fact, I didn’t let him see it until I was getting ready to hang the piece.

Why do I have this gap in my emotional attachment to my different art forms?  When I create the artwork with my two little hands, I’m very possessive of the piece and I don’t want it altered unless I trust the artist to complement my style and not overwhelm it.

After watching TMNK work on the four art pieces for the installation, I realized that his style was not really adding but reinventing the piece and taking it over.  By taking it over, it was no longer mine or ours… it was just his and that made me possessive of Plan B Dorothy.

I did not have this feeling with my digital work.  When I look at the above image of our combined work, I see them as our combined work and  I’m happy with what he decided to create. I had no say in what he created except by offering him the initial composition of Project T Banker and Project T Intellectual.

I especially love what TMNK decided to create with my street photographs.  Those images made me very happy. I’ve been trying to get Munich Artists to think like TMNK in regards to my photographs but they can’t. The idea of drawing all over my photographs is very stressful for a German artists and only Brigitte Pruchnow has been able to do it.

If you are interested in seeing what TMNK created while he was in my studio, please visit the Friday Gallery.  All his works created during his visit to Munich will be for sale at Frauenstrasse 18 which looks like this now:

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The Gallery will be officially reopened next week on January 11, 2016.  I still have to put a coat of white paint on the walls but all my studio materials are now contained and separated from the gallery space by these lovely dividers.

 

Written by Emmy Horstkamp

Hi, my name is Emmy and I live in Munich, Germany. If you want to know about art me visit my art page www.emmyhorstkamp.com or visit me in Munich, Germany

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